Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2008 Jul;393(4):581-8. doi: 10.1007/s00423-007-0273-3. Epub 2008 Jan 12.

Cigarette smoke-induced pancreatic damage: experimental data.

Author information

1
Departement of General and Visceral Surgery, Universitätsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. uwe.wittel@uniklinik-freiburg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Epidemiological data clearly indicate that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk for developing chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Despite of this clear epidemiological correlation, cigarette smoke-induced pancreatic damage has only been investigated in a small number of experimental studies.

METHODS:

Experimental studies examining the effect of cigarette smoke or cigarette smoke constituents on the pancreas were reviewed.

RESULTS:

Recent data indicate that smoking also induces chronic pancreatic inflammation in rodents within a period of 12 weeks upon exposure with environmental cigarette smoke. Supported by the finding that morphologic pancreatic damage is also induced by nicotine treatment, cigarette smoke-induced pancreatic damage is likely to be caused by a disturbance of regulation of exocrine pancreas. The morphological alterations, however, induced by nicotine, are less pronounced and therefore, other substances and pathophysiologic mechanisms, such as carcinogen action or cigarette smoke-induced reduction of anti-protease activity, are likely to aggravate pancreatic damage upon cigarette smoke inhalation.

CONCLUSION:

These data indicate that several constituents of cigarette smoke induce a disturbance of pancreatic function. This multifactorial event induces morphologic pancreatic damage upon cigarette smoke exposure in rodents.

PMID:
18193450
PMCID:
PMC3831350
DOI:
10.1007/s00423-007-0273-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center