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Am J Surg. 2008 Mar;195(3):298-302; discussion 302-3. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.12.005.

Intermediate-term outcomes of hepatitis C-positive compared with hepatitis C-negative deceased-donor renal allograft recipients.

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1
Section of Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prior studies have yielded conflicting results concerning the impact of HCV on renal transplant outcomes.

METHODS:

We examined outcomes in comparable groups of predominantly African American hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive (n = 34) and HCV-negative (n = 111) kidney transplant patients receiving contemporary immunosuppression.

RESULTS:

There was no difference in patient survival or acute rejection, but new-onset diabetes (NODM) was increased and graft survival decreased in the HCV-positive group, with increased graft loss secondary to noncompliance and Type I MPGN. The incidence of NODM among patients undergoing early corticosteroid withdrawal was 11% in both groups, while among those on prednisone, it was 47% in HCV-positive versus 25% in HCV-negative recipients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Deceased-donor HCV-positive renal allograft recipients have equivalent patient but decreased graft survival. Noncompliance and Type I MPGN play a role in producing this negative effect on graft outcome. Steroids may be required for HCV to exert its diabetogenicity in kidney transplant patients.

PMID:
18190891
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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