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PLoS One. 2007 Nov 7;2(11):e1145. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001145.

Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

Author information

1
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

PMID:
18188406
PMCID:
PMC2190619
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0001145
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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