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Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jul;19(7):991-9. doi: 10.1007/s00198-007-0525-7. Epub 2008 Jan 8.

Secondary contributors to bone loss in osteoporosis related hip fractures.

Author information

1
Bone Health and Osteoporosis Center, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 645 N Michigan, suite 630, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. bje168@northwestern.edu

Abstract

Osteoporosis treatment of patients with hip fractures is necessary to prevent subsequent fractures. Secondary causes for bone loss are present in more than 80% of patients with hip fractures, and therefore, assessment of Vitamin D status, disorders in calcium absorption and excretion, monoclonal gammopathies, and renal function should be performed. Identifying and managing these disorders will improve detection and enhance treatment aimed at reducing the risk of recurrent fractures in older adults.

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of disorders affecting bone and mineral metabolism in individuals with osteoporotic hip fractures.

METHODS:

Community dwelling individuals with hip fractures (HFx) 50 years of age and older. Assessment for vitamin D, renal and parathyroid status, calcium absorption, and plasma cell disorders.

RESULTS:

Of 157 HFx, mean age 70 +/- 10 years, HFx had higher creatinine (p = 0.002, 95% C.I. -0.09, 0.05); lower 25 OH vitamin D (p = 0.019, 95% C.I. 6.5, 2.7), albumin (p = 0.007, 95% C.I. 0.36, 0.009), and 24-h urine calcium (p = 0.024, 95% CI 51, 21) as compared to controls. More than 80% of HFx had at least one previously undiagnosed condition, with vitamin D insufficiency (61%), chronic kidney disease (16%) (CKD), monoclonal gammopathy (6%), and low calcium absorption (5%) being the most common. One case each of multiple myeloma and solitary plasmocytoma were identified.

CONCLUSIONS:

Osteoporosis treatment of HFx is necessary to prevent subsequent fractures. Secondary causes for bone loss are remarkably common in HFx; therefore, assessment of vitamin D status, disorders in calcium absorption and excretion, protein electrophoresis, and renal function should be performed. Identifying and correcting these disorders will improve detection and enhance treatment aimed at reducing the risk of recurrent fractures in older adults.

PMID:
18180974
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-007-0525-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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