Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2008 Apr;20(4):336-42. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2982.2007.01042.x. Epub 2007 Dec 19.

Vagal dysfunction in irritable bowel syndrome assessed by rectal distension and baroreceptor sensitivity.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. spaziar@mcmaster.ca

Erratum in

  • Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2008 May;20(5):576. Mazzadi, S [added].

Abstract

Autonomic nervous system dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study characterized the autonomic response to rectal distension in IBS using baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS), a measure of autonomic function. Rectal bag pressure, discomfort, pain, ECG, blood pressure and BRS were continuously measured before, during and after rectal distension in 98 healthy volunteers (34 +/- 12 years old, 52 females) and 39 IBS patients (39 +/- 11 years old, 35 females). In comparison with the healthy volunteers, IBS patients experienced significantly more discomfort (69 +/- 2.2% vs 56 +/- 3.6%; P < 0.05), but not pain (9 +/- 1.4% vs 6 +/- 2.4%; ns) with rectal distension despite similar distension pressures (51 +/- 1.4 vs 54 +/- 2.4 mmHg; ns) and volumes (394 +/- 10.9 vs 398 +/- 21.5 mL; ns). With rectal distension, heart rate increased in both healthy volunteers (66 +/- 1 to 71 +/- 1 bpm; P < 0.05) and IBS patients (66 +/- 2 to 74 +/- 3 bpm; P < 0.05). Systolic blood pressure also increased in both healthy volunteers (121 +/- 2 to 143 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05) and patients (126 +/- 3 to 153 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) as did diastolic blood pressure, 66 +/- 2 to 80 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.05), compared with 68 +/- 3 to 84 +/- 3 mmHg (P < 0.05) in IBS patients. The systolic blood pressure increase observed in IBS patients was greater than that seen in healthy volunteers and remained elevated in the post distension period (139 +/- 3 mmHg vs 129 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). IBS patients had lower BRS (7.85 +/- 0.4 ms mmHg(-1)) compared with healthy volunteers (9.4 +/- 0.3; P < 0.05) at rest and throughout rectal distension. Greater systolic blood pressure response to rectal distension and associated diminished BRS suggests a compromise of the autonomic nervous system in IBS patients.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center