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World J Gastroenterol. 2008 Jan 7;14(1):70-5.

Genetic changes of p53, K-ras, and microsatellite instability in gallbladder carcinoma in high-incidence areas of Japan and Hungary.

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  • 1Division of Molecular and Diagnostic Pathology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8510, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

To disclose geographic differences in genetic changes involved in gallbladder carcinogenesis between two distinct high-incidence areas of Japan and Hungary.

METHODS:

We examined 42 cases of gallbladder carcinoma: 22 Japanese and 20 Hungarian cases. p53 mutations at exons 5 to 8 and K-ras mutations at codon 12 were tested by direct sequencing. Microsatellite instability was determined from fluorescent dye-labeled PCR amplifications of five-microsatellite markers (BAT-25, BAT-26, D2S123, D5S346, and D17S250).

RESULTS:

Mutations of p53 were detected in 11 of 22 Japanese cases and 6 of 18 Hungarian cases (11/22 vs 6/18, P = 0.348). Transition at CpG sites was found in none of 11 Japanese cases and 2 of 6 Hungarian cases; the difference was marginally significant (0/11 vs 2/6, P = 0.110). K-ras mutations were detected in only one of the Hungarian cases. Eight of 19 (42.1%) Japanese cases were MSI-high (presence of novel peaks in more than one of the five loci analyzed), whereas only 1 of 15 (6.7%) Hungarian cases was MSI-high (P = 0.047).

CONCLUSION:

It appears that the p53 mutations and MSI differ in patients with gallbladder carcinoma between two distinct high-incidence areas. Geographic variation might exist in the process of gallbladder carcinogenesis.

PMID:
18176964
PMCID:
PMC2673394
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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