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Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2008 Jan;49(1):230-7. doi: 10.1167/iovs.07-0854.

How the brain obeys Hering's law: a TMS study of the posterior parietal cortex.

Author information

1
IRIS Group, CNRS-Coll├Ęge de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, Paris, France. marine.vernet@especi.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Human ocular saccades are not perfectly yoked; the origin of this disconjugacy (muscular versus central) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to test a cortical influence on the binocular coordination of saccades.

METHODS:

The authors used a gap paradigm to elicit vertical or horizontal saccades of 10 degrees , randomly interleaved; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied on the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) 100 ms after the target onset.

RESULTS:

TMS of the left or right PPC increased (i) the misalignment of the eyes during the presaccadic fixation period; (ii) the size difference between the saccades of the eyes, called disconjugacy; the increase of disconjugacy was significant for rightward and downward saccades after TMS of the right PPC and for downward saccades after TMS of the left PPC.

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors conclude that the PPC is actively involved in maintaining eye alignment during fixation and in the control of binocular coordination of saccades.

PMID:
18172097
DOI:
10.1167/iovs.07-0854
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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