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J Hepatol. 2008 Mar;48(3):399-406. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2007.10.011. Epub 2007 Dec 3.

Interplay between oxidative stress and hepatic steatosis in the progression of chronic hepatitis C.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Sciences, University Amedeo Avogadro of East Piedmont, Novara, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

The contribution of oxidative stress to the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is still poorly elucidated. This study investigated the relationship between oxidative stress, insulin resistance, steatosis and fibrosis in CHC.

METHODS:

IgG against malondialdehyde-albumin adducts and HOMA-IR were measured as markers of oxidative stress and insulin resistance, respectively, in 107 consecutive CHC patients.

RESULTS:

Oxidative stress was present in 61% of the patients, irrespective of age, gender, viral load, BMI, aminotransferase level, histology activity index (HAI) and HCV genotype. Insulin resistance and steatosis were evident in 80% and 70% of the patients, respectively. In the patients infected by HCV genotype non-3, but not in those with genotype 3 infection HOMA-IR (p<0.03), steatosis (p=0.02) and fibrosis (p<0.05) were higher in the subjects with oxidative stress than in those without. Multiple regression analysis revealed that, HOMA-IR (p<0.01), fibrosis (p<0.01) and oxidative stress (p<0.05) were independently associated with steatosis, whereas steatosis was independently associated with oxidative stress (p<0.03) and HOMA-IR (p<0.02). Steatosis (p<0.02) and HAI (p=0.007) were also independent predictors of fibrosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients infected by HCV genotype non-3, oxidative stress and insulin resistance contribute to steatosis, which in turn exacerbates both insulin resistance and oxidative stress and accelerates the progression of fibrosis.

PMID:
18164507
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhep.2007.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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