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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Jan;89(1):36-41. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.08.121.

Elevated C-reactive protein associated with decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in men with spinal cord injury.

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1
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine if people with spinal cord injury (SCI) have elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), to examine the association of CRP with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and to assess the influence of completeness and level of injury on these parameters.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

SETTING:

Urban university.

PARTICIPANTS:

Men with SCI (n=129) who were free of infection and/or recent anti-inflammatory medication use as well as their 1:1 age- and race-matched able-bodied counterparts from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

High CRP was defined as 3 mg/L or higher and low HDL-C as less than 1.04 mmol/L.

RESULTS:

Men with SCI were more likely to have high CRP (odds ratio [OR]=2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-3.95) and low HDL-C (OR=1.81; 95% CI, 1.01-3.27). The OR for low HDL-C in SCI was no longer significant when high CRP was controlled. CRP was higher in complete versus incomplete injury (median, 3.7 mg/L vs 1.2mg/L; P=.005), and this elevation was independent of age, smoking, physical activity, waist circumference, and weight. No conclusion can be made on the association of injury level and CRP because of a lack of power.

CONCLUSIONS:

The elevated CRP, possibly the major risk factor, together with decreased HDL-C may contribute to greater incidence for cardiovascular disease in the SCI population.

PMID:
18164328
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2007.08.121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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