Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Biol Psychiatry. 2008 May 15;63(10):990-6. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.10.025. Epub 2008 Feb 27.

A rhesus monkey model of self-injury: effects of relocation stress on behavior and neuroendocrine function.

Author information

1
Division of Behavioral Biology, New England Primate Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Southborough, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Self-injurious behavior (SIB), a disorder that afflicts many individuals within both clinical and nonclinical populations, has been linked to states of heightened stress and arousal. However, there are no published longitudinal data on the relationship between increases in stress and changes in the incidence of SIB. This study investigated the short- and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine responses of SIB and control monkeys to the stress of relocation.

METHODS:

Twenty adult male rhesus macaques were exposed to the stress of relocation to a new housing arrangement in a newly constructed facility. Daytime behavior, sleep, and multiple measures of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis function were investigated before and after the move.

RESULTS:

Relocation induced a complex pattern of short- and long-term effects in the animals. The SIB animals showed a long-lasting increase in self-biting behavior, as well as evidence of sleep disturbance. Both groups exhibited elevated cortisol levels in saliva, serum, and hair, and also an unexpected delayed increase in circulating concentrations of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that relocation is a significant stressor for rhesus macaques and that this stressor triggers an increase in self-biting behavior as well as sleep disturbance in monkeys previously identified as suffering from SIB. These findings suggest that life stresses may similarly exacerbate SIB in humans with this disorder. The HPA axis results underscore the potential role of CBG in regulating long-term neuroendocrine responses to major stressors.

PMID:
18164279
PMCID:
PMC2486411
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.10.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center