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J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Aug;23(8 Pt 2):e367-72. Epub 2007 Dec 16.

Treatment outcomes of hepatic and pulmonary metastases from colorectal carcinoma.

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1
Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

The resection of synchronous or metachronous pulmonary and liver metastasis is an aggressive treatment option for patients with stage IV colorectal cancer and has been shown to yield acceptable long-term survival. We reviewed our experience with colorectal cancer patients with both liver and lung resections to determine the efficacy of surgical resections.

METHODS:

We performed a single institution, retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent surgical hepatic and pulmonary resection for metastatic colorectal cancer between 1995 and 2004.

RESULTS:

A total of 32 patients underwent resection of both hepatic and pulmonary metastases secondary to colorectal cancer. The 5-year overall survival from initial operation was 60.8%. The disease-free interval was 44.3 months (95% confidence interval: 24.7 and 63.8, respectively). Neither the number of pulmonary lesions nor the time interval between the primary surgery and the metastasectomy had a significant impact on survival (P = 0.134).

CONCLUSION:

An aggressive surgical treatment of selected colorectal cancer patients with lung and liver metastases resulted in prolonged survival. The 5-year survival rate of 60.8% with no perioperative mortality was observed in our study.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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