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J Urol. 2008 Feb;179(2):759-63. Epub 2007 Dec 20.

Bacterial cystitis is accompanied by increased peripheral thermal sensitivity in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Visceral inflammation and pain associated with chemical cystitis produce increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli in the sacral dermatomes. We determined whether a similar sensitization occurs in response to bacterial cystitis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Bacterial cystitis was induced by intravesical instillation of Escherichia coli 1677 in female C57BL/6N and C3H/OuJ mice (Jackson Laboratories, Bar Harbor, Maine). C3H/HeJ mice (Jackson Laboratories) served as a control because C3H/HeJ mice lack functional toll-like receptor 4, which is an essential component of cellular recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Hind paw sensitivity to thermal stimulus was quantitatively determined 1, 2, 7 and 14 days after infection.

RESULTS:

Intravesical instillation of E. coli produced infection in all strains of mice. Infection persisted in all C3H/OuJ and C3H/HeJ mice but it spontaneously cleared in some C57BL/6N mice. Increased sensitivity to thermal stimuli was observed in C57BL/6N and C3H/OuJ mice starting 1 to 2 days after E. coli instillation and it was still present 14 days after instillation. Increased sensitivity to thermal stimuli did not occur in C3H/HeJ mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

E. coli induced cystitis produced increased sensitivity to peripheral thermal stimuli in mice with competent toll-like receptor 4.

PMID:
18082197
PMCID:
PMC2668952
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2007.09.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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