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Lung Cancer. 2008 Jun;60(3):416-25. Epub 2008 Feb 20.

Telomere shortening is associated with poor prognosis and telomerase activity correlates with DNA repair impairment in non-small cell lung cancer.

Author information

1
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, 28040-Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Telomere function and DNA damage response pathways are frequently inactivated in cancer. Moreover, some telomere-binding proteins have been implicated in DNA repair. The purpose of this work consists of evaluating the prognostic impact of telomere dysfunction and its relationship with DNA repair systems in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We analysed 83 NSCLCs and their corresponding control samples obtained from patients submitted to surgery. Telomere function was evaluated by determining telomerase activity and telomere length. DNA repair expression assays were established by using cDNA arrays containing 96 DNA-repair genes and by Real Time Quantitative PCR.

RESULTS:

Our data indicated that telomere attrition was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome of patients (P=0.02), being this parameter a significant prognostic factor independent of tumour stage (P=0.012; relative risk=1.887; 95% CI: 1.147-3.102). DNA-repair gene expression studies showed down regulation of DCLRE1C and GTF2H1 and a clear FLJ10858 up regulation in tumour tissues, as compared to controls. In addition, a number of genes related to DNA-repair were significantly down regulated in tumours that reactivated telomerase (DCLRE1C, GTF2H1, PARP-3, MLH1, and TRF2).

CONCLUSIONS:

Telomere shortening emerged as a poor clinical evolution parameter in NSCLC. Moreover, results from this work suggest a relationship between the loss of several DNA repair genes and telomerase activity, which may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of non-small lung cancer.

PMID:
18077053
DOI:
10.1016/j.lungcan.2007.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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