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Circulation. 2007 Dec 18;116(25):2908-12. Epub 2007 Dec 10.

Survival is similar after standard treatment and chest compression only in out-of-hospital bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology and Stockholm Prehospital Centre, Karolinska Institute, South General Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We sought to compare the 1-month survival rates among patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who had been given bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in relation to whether they had received standard CPR with chest compression plus mouth-to-mouth ventilation or chest compression only.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

All patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received bystander CPR and who were reported to the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register between 1990 and 2005 were included. Crew-witnessed cases were excluded. Among 11,275 patients, 73% (n=8209) received standard CPR, and 10% (n=1145) received chest compression only. There was no significant difference in 1-month survival between patients who received standard CPR (1-month survival=7.2%) and those who received chest compression only (1-month survival=6.7%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received bystander CPR, there was no significant difference in 1-month survival between a standard CPR program with chest compression plus mouth-to-mouth ventilation and a simplified version of CPR with chest compression only.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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