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Steroids. 2008 Mar;73(3):272-9. Epub 2007 Nov 4.

Differential effects of estrogen and progesterone on potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. cmw45@georgetown.edu

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS:

Potassium (K(+)) channel activation contributes in part to estrogen-mediated vasorelaxation. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. We hypothesize that estrogen increases K(+) currents via membrane-associated, non-genomic interaction and that steroid hormones have differential effects on different types of K(+) channels.

EXPERIMENTAL:

Human large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) and human voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(V1.5)) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and K(+) currents elicited by voltage clamp were measured.

RESULTS:

Both 17beta-estradiol and BSA-conjugated 17beta-estradiol increased the BK(Ca) current in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was abolished by tetraethylammonium ions and iberiotoxin (putative BK(Ca) channel blockers). 17beta-estradiol-stimulated increase in the BK(Ca) current was unaffected by treatment with ICI 182,780 (classic estrogen receptor antagonist), tamoxifen (estrogen receptor agonist/antagonist), actinomycin D (RNA synthesis inhibitor), or cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor). In contrast, progesterone reduced the BK(Ca) current in the absence or presence of NS 1619 (BK(Ca) channel activator). Progesterone also inhibited 17beta-estradiol-stimulated increase in the BK(Ca) current. Finally, progesterone but not 17beta-estradiol reduced the K(V1.5) current.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present results show that 17beta-estradiol stimulates BK(Ca) channels without affecting K(V1.5) channels. This effect is ICI 182,780-insensitive and is likely mediated via a membrane-bound binding site. Progesterone inhibits both BK(Ca)- and K(V1.5)-encoded currents. The present results suggest that inhibition of K(+) channels may contribute in part to its reported antagonism against 17beta-estradiol-mediated vascular relaxation via BK(Ca) channels.

PMID:
18068743
DOI:
10.1016/j.steroids.2007.10.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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