Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Clin Anesth. 2007 Nov;19(7):517-22.

Self-reported changes in attitude and behavior after attending a simulation-aided airway management course.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, Georg-August University, 37075, Göttingen, Germany. srusso@zari.de

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the influence of a simulator-aided course for airway management on participants' daily clinical airway management practice.

DESIGN:

Survey instrument.

SETTING:

University hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

88 participants who attended a simulator-aided course for airway management.

INTERVENTION:

Six mo after 4 consecutive courses with identical structure and content, participants were mailed a standardized questionnaire to answer.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Of 88 participants queried, 48 completed the questionnaire. Ninety-two percent had experienced a difficult airway situation in the 6 mo after the course. Fourteen (29%) evaluated predictors for a difficult airway more carefully. Fourteen (29%) established structural changes within their departments. Ten (21%) participants acquired new technical airway devices. The mean estimated impact on the participants' rating for lectures, skill stations, and scenarios on a scale from 1 (very helpful) to 6 (not at all helpful) was 2.8 for lectures, 1.6 for skill stations, and 1.4 for scenarios.

CONCLUSIONS:

Attendance at a simulator-aided airway management course has a significant impact on self-reported accuracy and confidence in evaluation of airways, use of alternative airway devices, and changes in the practitioner's clinical practice toward difficult airway situations.

PMID:
18063206
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinane.2007.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center