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J Psychosom Res. 2007 Dec;63(6):647-55.

Relaxation and guided imagery program in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy is not associated with neuroimmunomodulatory effects.

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1
Faculdade de Psicologia, Hospital São Lucas, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (RS), Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Treatment of breast cancer is usually associated with significant psychological stress. In this study, we examined the effects of relaxation and visualization therapy (RVT) on psychological distress, cortisol levels, and immunological parameters of breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

METHODS:

Participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental (n=20) who underwent group RVT for 24 consecutive days or control group (n=14) who were on radiotherapy only. Psychological scores (stress, anxiety, and depression) were measured by structured clinical interviews. Salivary cortisol was assessed along the day. Lymphocytes were isolated and cultured to measure T-cell proliferation and sensitivity to glucocorticoids (GCs).

RESULTS:

RVT was effective to reduce stress, anxiety, and depression scores (all P<.05). However, cortisol levels as well as proliferation remained unchanged following RVT. Although T cells of experimental group were more sensitive to GCs than cells of controls at baseline, no changes were noted following RVT. Cortisol levels were positively correlated to anxiety and depression scores and inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation and sensitivity to GCs.

CONCLUSION:

We conclude that the psychological intervention was capable to attenuate the emotional distress presented during radiotherapy treatment. A longer RVT or worse psychological morbidity at baseline may be necessary to translate psychological into biological changes.

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