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Dig Liver Dis. 2008 Apr;40(4):267-74. Epub 2007 Dec 4.

Aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) can predict liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There have been still few valuable markers that can be used as indirect markers of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B.

AIMS:

This study aimed to evaluate efficacy of several indirect markers of liver fibrosis and to identify the most valuable test in chronic hepatitis B.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 264 patients with chronic hepatitis B were consecutively enrolled. Fibrosis was staged by a single blinded pathologist according to the METAVIR system. Significant fibrosis was defined as stage >or=2. We investigated diagnostic accuracy of four indirect markers including aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index for predicting significant fibrosis.

RESULTS:

Mean age was 28 years. 53% (141/264) had significant hepatic fibrosis. Of indirect markers, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index yielded the best area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.91). Positive predictive value/negative predictive value at 0.5, 1.5 and 2.0 of aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index score for predicting significant fibrosis were 63%/91%, 83%/74% and 86%/65%, respectively. The odds ratio for aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index >or=1.4 relative to less than aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index of 1.4 was 17.971 (p<0.0001; 95% confidence interval, 9.677-33.376).

CONCLUSIONS:

Of simple markers already developed in chronic hepatitis C, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index may be the most accurate and simple marker for predicting significant fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B.

PMID:
18055281
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2007.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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