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J Pain. 2008 Mar;9(3):210-6. Epub 2007 Dec 11.

Patients' self-criticism is a stronger predictor of physician's evaluation of prognosis than pain diagnosis or severity in chronic pain patients.

Author information

1
The Pain Clinic, Division of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel. rudich@bgu.ac.il

Abstract

The experience of pain is influenced by patients' personality, social and cultural background, and patient-doctor interaction. This study examines the role of self-reported pain, pain diagnosis, age, gender, depression, and the personality trait of self-criticism (defined as individuals' tendency to set unrealistically high self-standards and to adopt a punitive stance toward one's self), in determining physicians' view of expected prognosis in response to chronic pain management. Before the first visit to a tertiary chronic pain clinic, patients provided information regarding their perceived pain, depression, and self-criticism. Immediately subsequent to the visit, physicians' evaluated expected prognosis. Participating physicians were blinded to the patient's psychosocial variables collected. Sixty-four patients with chronic pain (34 women and 30 men) with various diagnoses were included. Patients' age, gender, pain diagnosis, self-reported pain, and depression did not significantly correlate with physician's estimation of expected prognosis. In contrast, patients' self-criticism emerged as an independent predictor of physicians' pessimism regarding outcome. Thus, in the chronic pain clinic setting, patients' personality, rather than self-reported pain experience, determines doctor's clinical judgment of expected prognosis.

PERSPECTIVE:

Chronic pain is a multimodal negative experience that is determined by physiological, cognitive, personological, and interpersonal factors. In line with this observation, we found patients' personality, specifically, their self-criticism, determines physicians' clinical judgment of expected prognosis.

PMID:
18055267
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpain.2007.10.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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