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J Affect Disord. 2008 Jun;108(3):291-6. Epub 2007 Nov 28.

Light room therapy effective in mild forms of seasonal affective disorder--a randomised controlled study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. cecilia.rastad@ltdalarna.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The most common way to provide bright light therapy to Swedish patients with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), is treatment in a light therapy room. Since few studies have evaluated treatment provided in this setting and few have evaluated the effect of bright light in sub-clinical SAD (S-SAD), such a study including a one-month follow-up was designed.

METHODS:

Fifty adults recruited from a previous prevalence study and clinically assessed as having SAD or S-SAD, were randomised to treatment in a light room or to a three-week waiting-list control group. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorders Self-rating 29-items Version (SIGH-SAD/SR) was used to measure depressive mood at baseline, directly following treatment and at the one-month follow-up.

RESULTS:

ANCOVA with adjustment for baseline depression score, showed a significant main effect for the light room therapy group (p<0.001). Fifty-four percent (n=13/24) improved > or = 50% while no such improvement was seen in the control condition (n=0/24). After merging the two groups, repeated measures ANOVA confirmed the experimental analysis (p<0.001). At the one-month follow-up, 83.0% (n=39/47) had improved > or = 50% and 63.8% (n=30/47) had normal depression scores, i.e. < or = 8.

CONCLUSIONS:

Light room therapy was effective in reducing depressive symptoms in subjects with winter depressive mood. Results were maintained over a period of one month.

PMID:
18053580
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2007.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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