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BMJ. 2007 Dec 8;335(7631):1210-2. Epub 2007 Nov 29.

Six year audit of cardiac arrests and medical emergency team calls in an Australian outer metropolitan teaching hospital.

Author information

1
Intensive Care Unit, Dandenong Hospital, PO Box 478, Dandenong, VIC 3175, Australia. mbuist@patientrack.com

Abstract

PROBLEM:

In-hospital cardiac arrest often represents failure of optimal clinical care. The use of medical emergency teams to prevent such events is controversial. In-hospital cardiac arrests have been reduced in several single centre historical control studies, but the only randomised prospective study showed no such benefit. In our hospital an important problem was failure to call the medical emergency team or cardiac arrest team when, before in-hospital cardiac arrest, patients had fulfilled the criteria for calling the team.

DESIGN:

Single centre, prospective audit of cardiac arrests and data on use of the medical emergency team during 2000 to 2005.

SETTING:

400 bed general outer suburban metropolitan teaching hospital.

STRATEGIES FOR CHANGE:

Three initiatives in the hospital to improve use of the medical emergency team: orientation programme for first year doctors, professional development course for medical registrars, and the evolving role of liaison intensive care unit nurses.

KEY MEASURES FOR IMPROVEMENT:

Incidence of cardiac arrests. EFFECTS OF THE CHANGE: Incidence of cardiac arrests decreased 24% per year, from 2.4/1000 admissions in 2000 to 0.66/1000 admissions in 2005.

LESSONS LEARNT:

Medical emergency teams can be efficacious when supported with a multidisciplinary, multifaceted education system for clinical staff.

PMID:
18048504
PMCID:
PMC2128682
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.39385.534236.47
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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