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Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Jan;3(1):85-90. Epub 2007 Nov 28.

Removal of the protein-bound solutes indican and p-cresol sulfate by peritoneal dialysis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, and Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Protein-bound solutes are poorly cleared by peritoneal dialysis. We examined the hypothesis that plasma concentrations of bound solutes would therefore rise as residual renal function is lost.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS:

Clearances of urea indican and p-cresol sulfate were measured in peritoneal dialysis patients with and without residual function.

RESULTS:

In patients with residual function, protein binding restricted the peritoneal indican and p-cresol sulfate clearances to 0.3 +/- 0.1 ml/min, as compared to the peritoneal urea clearance of 5.5 +/- 1.1 ml/min. The urinary indican and p-cresol sulfate clearances of 2.7 +/- 2.5 and 1.3 +/- 1.0 ml/min were closer to the urinary urea clearance of 3.9 +/- 2.2 ml/min, reflecting the superior ability of native kidney function to clear bound solutes. Urinary clearance thus provided the majority of the total indican and p-cresol sulfate clearances of 3.0 +/- 2.5 and 1.6 +/- 1.0 ml/min in patients with residual function but the minority of total urea clearance of 9.4 +/- 2.2 ml/min. Loss of residual function lowered the total clearances for indican and p-cresol sulfate to 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 0.4 +/- 0.2 ml/min, whereas the urea clearance fell only slightly. However there was only a modest increase in the plasma indican level and no increase in the plasma p-cresol sulfate level in patients with no residual function because reduction in the daily removal of these solutes accompanied the reduction in their total clearance rates.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reduction in the removal of indican and p-cresol sulfate kept plasma levels from rising markedly when residual function was lost.

PMID:
18045861
PMCID:
PMC2390983
DOI:
10.2215/CJN.02570607
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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