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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007 Dec;137(6):942-6.

Acute rise in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a coastal community.

Author information

1
Tripler Army Medical Center, Tripler, HI, USA. nici.eddy.bothwell@us.army.mil

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Describe the incidence of head and neck community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections over a 5-year period at a coastal tertiary medical center.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective chart review.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

All patients presenting to the otolaryngology service with cultures taken from head and neck infections between 1999 and 2004 were eligible for inclusion. Statistical analysis was used to determine significance of the changing incidence of isolated organisms over the study period.

RESULTS:

CA-MRSA infections rose from 21% to 64% over the 5-year period. The increasing trend in CA-MRSA infections reached statistical significance from 2003 to 2004. All CA-MRSA isolates were resistant to cefazolin and penicillin, but most were sensitive to clindamycin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data demonstrates a striking increase in the incidence of CA-MRSA. We have tailored our treatment of cutaneous head and neck infections to include empiric treatment for CA-MRSA using clindamycin. Awareness and monitoring of this trend will be important for all practitioners involved in the care of these patients.

PMID:
18036425
DOI:
10.1016/j.otohns.2007.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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