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J Perinatol. 2008 Feb;28(2):149-55. Epub 2007 Nov 22.

Angiopoietin 2 concentrations in infants developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia: attenuation by dexamethasone.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Cooper University Hospital Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ Camden, NJ, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To study the association between angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) concentrations in tracheal aspirates (TAs) and adverse outcome (bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)/death) in ventilated premature infants (VPIs) and modulation of Ang2 concentrations with dexamethasone (Dex) use.

STUDY DESIGN:

Serial TA samples were collected on days 1, 3, 5 and 7, and Ang2 concentrations were measured. Ang2 TA concentrations were compared prior to and after 48 to 72 h of using Dex.

RESULT:

A total of 151 TA samples were collected from 60 VPIs. BPD was defined as the oxygen requirement at 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Twelve infants (mean+/-s.d.) (gestational age (GA) 26.5+/-2.1 weeks, birth weight (BW) 913+/-230 g) had no BPD, 32 infants (GA 25.8+/-1.4 weeks, BW 768+/-157 g) developed BPD and 16 infants (GA 24.5+/-1.1 weeks, BW 710+/-143 g) died before 36 weeks PMA. Ang2 concentrations were significantly lower in infants with no BPD (median, 25th and 75th percentile) (157, 16 and 218 pg mg(-1)) compared with those who developed BPD (234, 138 and 338 pg mg(-1), P=0.03) or BPD and/or death (234, 157 and 347 pg mg(-1), P=0.017), in the first week of life. Twenty-six VPIs (BW 719+/-136 g, GA 25.1+/-1.3 weeks) received 27 courses of Dex. Ang2 concentrations before starting Dex were 202, 137 and 278 pg mg(-1) and significantly decreased to 144, 0 and 224 pg mg(-1) after therapy (P=0.007).

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher Ang2 concentrations in TAs are associated with the development of BPD or death in VPIs. Dex use suppressed Ang2 concentrations.

PMID:
18033304
DOI:
10.1038/sj.jp.7211886
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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