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Schizophr Res. 2008 Jan;98(1-3):40-6. Epub 2007 Nov 26.

Exploring genetic variations that may be associated with the direct effects of some antipsychotics on lipid levels.

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1
University of Kentucky Mental Health Research Center at Eastern State Hospital, College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky 40508, United States. jdeleon@uky.edu

Abstract

The goal of this study was to select some genes that may serve as good candidates for future studies of the direct effects (not explained by obesity) of some antipsychotics on hyperlipidemia. A search for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may be associated with these direct effects was conducted. From a published cross-sectional sample, 357 patients on antipsychotics were genotyped using a DNA microarray with 384 SNPs. A total of 165 patients were taking olanzapine, quetiapine or chlorpromazine which may directly cause hypertriglyceridemia or hypercholesterolemia. Another 192 patients taking other antipsychotics were controls. A two-stage statistical analysis that included loglinear and logistic models was developed to select SNPs blindly. In a third stage, physiological knowledge was used to select promising SNPs. Known physiological mechanisms were supported for 3 associations found in patients taking olanzapine, quetiapine or chlorpromazine [acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase alpha SNP (rs4072032) in the hypertriglyceridemia model, and for the neuropeptide Y (rs1468271) and ACCbeta, (rs2241220) in the hypercholesterolemia model]. These genes may be promising candidates for studies of the direct effects of some antipsychotics on hyperlipidemia.

PMID:
18031993
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2007.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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