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J Pediatr Psychol. 2008 Oct;33(9):939-55; discussion 956-7. Epub 2007 Nov 17.

Evidence-based assessment of pediatric pain.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-5010, USA. llcohen@gsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To conduct an evidence-based review of pediatric pain measures.

METHODS:

Seventeen measures were examined, spanning pain intensity self-report, questionnaires and diaries, and behavioral observations. Measures were classified as "Well-established," "Approaching well-established," or "Promising" according to established criteria. Information was highlighted to help professionals evaluate the instruments for particular purposes (e.g., research, clinical work).

RESULTS:

Eleven measures met criteria for "Well-established," six "Approaching well-established," and zero were classified as "Promising."

CONCLUSIONS:

There are a number of strong measures for assessing children's pain, which allows professionals options to meet their particular needs. Future directions in pain assessment are identified, such as highlighting culture and the impact of pain on functioning. This review examines the research and characteristics of some of the commonly used pain tools in hopes that the reader will be able to use this evidence-based approach and the information in future selection of assessment devices for pediatric pain.

PMID:
18024983
PMCID:
PMC2639489
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsm103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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