Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2008 Sep-Oct;18(5):976-84. Epub 2007 Nov 16.

Effect of a c-Met-specific, ATP-competitive small-molecule inhibitor SU11274 on human ovarian carcinoma cell growth, motility, and invasion.

Author information

1
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

Increased expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met has been shown to correlate with enhanced cell proliferation, motility, and invasion. The objectives of this study were to characterize total and activated c-Met expression in both normal and malignant human ovarian epithelial cells and to determine the effects of inhibiting the activation of c-Met on ovarian epithelial cell growth, motility, and invasion. Total c-Met was overexpressed in 82 (68%) of 119 ovarian carcinomas, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed that ovarian carcinoma cell lines had higher levels of c-Met messenger RNA, total protein, and activated protein expression compared to normal ovarian epithelial cell cultures. Using a specific adenosine triphosphate-competitive small-molecule inhibitor, SU11274, activated c-Met was decreased in normal and ovarian carcinoma cell lines. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays showed that cell growth inhibition directly correlated to the level of activated c-Met detected in each cell line (r =-0.87, P = 0.012). Using modified Boyden chamber assays, ovarian carcinoma cells treated with SU11274 demonstrated significantly decreased cell motility and invasion compared to untreated cells (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively). These data indicate that c-Met is overexpressed in the majority of malignant ovarian epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro and that decreasing activated c-Met in vitro can significantly decrease ovarian carcinoma cell growth, motility, and invasion. Developing therapies that specifically inhibit the activation of c-Met may represent a novel therapeutic modality for patients with ovarian carcinomas expressing high levels of c-Met.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center