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Health Psychol. 2007 Nov;26(6):660-7.

Systematic review and meta-analysis of psychological and activity-based interventions for cancer-related fatigue.

Author information

1
Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Moffitt Cancer Center and University of South Florida, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa FL 33612, USA. paul.jacobsen@moffitt.org

Erratum in

  • Health Psychol. 2008 Jan;27(1):42.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Fatigue is among the most common and distressing symptoms experienced by cancer patients.

OBJECTIVE:

This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the efficacy of psychological and activity-based interventions against cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients.

DATA SOURCES:

MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL.

STUDY SELECTION:

Randomized controlled trials of psychological and activity-based interventions involving adult cancer patients in which fatigue was an outcome were reviewed.

EXTRACTION:

Forty-one trials were reviewed and 30 were included in a meta-analysis.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Fifty percent of psychological trials and 44% of activity-based trials rated fair or better in quality yielded significant findings favoring the intervention condition. Meta-analysis yielded an overall effect size of 0.09 (95% CI = .02- .16) favoring nonpharmacological conditions. Further analysis indicated that effect sizes were significant for psychological interventions (d-sub(w) = .10, 95% CI = .02-.18) but not activity-based interventions (d-sub(w) = .05, 95% CI = -.08 - .19).

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings provide limited support for use of nonpharmacological interventions to manage cancer-related fatigue. The lack of research with heightened fatigue as an eligibility criterion is a notable weakness of the existing evidence base.

PMID:
18020836
PMCID:
PMC2398706
DOI:
10.1037/0278-6133.26.6.660
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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