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Dev Psychol. 2007 Nov;43(6):1428-1446. doi: 10.1037/0012-1649.43.6.1428.

School readiness and later achievement.

Author information

1
School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University.
2
Department of Human Ecology, University of Texas.
3
Department of Social Work, University of Wisconsin.
4
Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University.
5
Department of Psychoeducation, Universite de Montreal.
6
Department of Quantitative Social Science, Institute of Education, University of London.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University.
8
Research Center for Group Dynamics, University of Michigan.
9
Departement d'education et formation specialisees, Universite de Quebec a Montreal.

Erratum in

  • Dev Psychol. 2008 Jan;44(1):232.

Abstract

Using 6 longitudinal data sets, the authors estimate links between three key elements of school readiness--school-entry academic, attention, and socioemotional skills--and later school reading and math achievement. In an effort to isolate the effects of these school-entry skills, the authors ensured that most of their regression models control for cognitive, attention, and socioemotional skills measured prior to school entry, as well as a host of family background measures. Across all 6 studies, the strongest predictors of later achievement are school-entry math, reading, and attention skills. A meta-analysis of the results shows that early math skills have the greatest predictive power, followed by reading and then attention skills. By contrast, measures of socioemotional behaviors, including internalizing and externalizing problems and social skills, were generally insignificant predictors of later academic performance, even among children with relatively high levels of problem behavior. Patterns of association were similar for boys and girls and for children from high and low socioeconomic backgrounds.

PMID:
18020822
DOI:
10.1037/0012-1649.43.6.1428
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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