Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Feb 1;167(3):313-20. Epub 2007 Nov 15.

Vitamin K and vitamin D status: associations with inflammatory markers in the Framingham Offspring Study.

Author information

1
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

Abstract

In vitro data suggest protective roles for vitamins K and D in inflammation. To examine associations between vitamins K and D and inflammation in vivo, the authors used multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, triglyceride concentrations, use of aspirin, use of lipid-lowering medication, season, menopausal status, and hormone replacement therapy. Participants were from the Framingham Offspring Study (1997-2001; n = 1,381; mean age = 59 years; 52% women). Vitamin K status, measured by plasma phylloquinone concentration and phylloquinone intake, was inversely associated with circulating inflammatory markers as a group and with several individual inflammatory biomarkers (p < 0.01). Percentage of undercarboxylated osteocalcin, a functional measure of vitamin K status, was not associated with overall inflammation but was associated with C-reactive protein (p < 0.01). Although plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D was inversely associated with urinary isoprostane concentration, an indicator of oxidative stress (p < 0.01), overall associations between vitamin D status and inflammation were inconsistent. The observation that high vitamin K status was associated with lower concentrations of inflammatory markers suggests that a possible protective role for vitamin K in inflammation merits further investigation.

PMID:
18006902
PMCID:
PMC3151653
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwm306
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication types, MeSH terms, Substances, Grant support

Publication types

MeSH terms

Substances

Grant support

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center