Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Surg Oncol. 2008 Jan;15(1):52-9. Epub 2007 Nov 14.

Surgically managed gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a comparative and prognostic analysis.

Author information

1
Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, SIU School of Medicine, 701 N Rutledge, PO Box 19638, Springfield, IL, 67308, USA, ihassan@siumed.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been shown to have marked clinical efficacy in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We performed a comparative and prognostic analysis of our experience with surgically managed GIST to determine factors associated with adverse oncologic outcomes.

METHODS:

Oncologic outcomes of 191 patients with primary GIST surgically managed between 1978 and 2004 at a single institution were reviewed. Prognostic factors were analyzed by Cox analysis (hazard ratio [HR] and 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) and included age, sex, disease presentation (asymptomatic vs. symptomatic), tumor site (stomach, small bowel, colorectal), disease extent (localized vs. metastatic) and risk levels (high, intermediate, low, very-low) assigned on the basis of size and number of mitoses according to current National Institutes of Health recommendations. Primary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS).

RESULTS:

A total of 186 patients (97%) had c-kit-positive GIST. There were 54% high, 22% intermediate, 18% low, and 8% very low risk GIST originating from the stomach (54%), small bowel (36%), and colon and rectum (10%). Median patient age was 65 (range, 13-91) years, and 108 subjects (57%) were male. Seventy-two percent of patients had symptomatic local disease, and 21% patients had synchronous metastases. Most (95%) underwent R0 resections of their primary tumor. Among 146 patients (76%) with localized disease at presentation undergoing R0 resection, the 5-year DFS was 65%. High-risk GIST (HR 12, 95% CI, 5-32, P < .0001), symptomatic presentation (HR 2.5, 95% CI, 1.1-6, P = .04), and GIST in the small bowel (HR 2.8, 95% CI, 1-5, P = .003) were independently associated with decreased DFS. After a median follow-up of 63 months among survivors, the 5-year DSS was 68%. High-risk disease (HR 14.3, 95% CI, 5-41, P < .0001), symptomatic presentation (HR 3.1, 95% CI, 1.2-7.9, P = .02), and GIST in the small bowel (2.6,3 95% CI, 1-5, P = .006) were independently associated with decreased DSS.

CONCLUSIONS:

High-risk GIST are associated with increased disease recurrence and decreased survival despite complete surgical resection. These patients should receive adjuvant therapy in the form of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

PMID:
18000711
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-007-9633-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center