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Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2007 Nov;89(8):796-8.

Impact of surgeon-specific data reporting on surgical training.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK. omarkhan@iname.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Since April 2002, collection and publication of surgeon-specific data in adult cardiac surgery has become mandatory in the UK. It has been suggested that this may discourage consultants from allowing trainees to perform cases. The aim of this study was to attempt to analyse the effect of the introduction of surgeon-specific data (SSD) on surgical training in a large cardiac surgical centre.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A retrospective analysis was performed on 2111 consecutive patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery, aortic and mitral valve surgery at Southampton General Hospital between April 2000 and April 2004. Results were analysed and compared over a 2-year period prior to and a 2-year period following the introduction of SSD.

RESULTS:

There were no changes in the overall mortality rate following the introduction of SSD. SSD was associated with a reduction in the overall proportion of cases performed by trainees (49% versus 42.8%; P = 0.004) and, in particular, a reduction in the proportion of aortic and mitral valve procedures performed by trainees. In addition, the proportion of cases performed by the trainees without consultant supervision declined significantly following SSD (18.7% versus 10.4%; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Publication of surgeon-specific data has coincided with a decrease in both the proportion and variety of cases performed by trainees.

PMID:
17999823
PMCID:
PMC2173189
DOI:
10.1308/003588407X232080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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