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Transplantation. 2007 Nov 15;84(9):1097-102.

Determinants of lumen loss between years 1 and 2 after cardiac transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We previously reported that negative remodeling, not plaque progression, correlated with lumen loss during the first year after cardiac transplantation and that cytomegalovirus antibody seropositivity correlated with increased negative remodeling and greater lumen loss. Whether these findings persist between years 1 and 2 after transplantation is unknown.

METHODS:

Serial 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound analysis in the left anterior descending coronary artery was performed in 30 cardiac transplant recipients at year 1 and 2 after transplantation. Vessel, lumen, and plaque area were determined at 0.5-mm axial intervals in the first 50 mm of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and volumes were computed using Simpson's method. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify clinical predictors of change in coronary dimensions.

RESULTS:

Although mean vessel area did not change (13.6+/-3.4 to 13.4+/-3.3 mm/mm(3), P=0.45), mean plaque area increased (3.4+/-2.3 to 3.8+/-2.2 mm/mm(3), P=0.012), resulting in significant mean lumen area loss (10.3+/-2.5 to 9.6+/-2.3 mm/mm(3), P=0.016). However, the degree of luminal change strongly correlated with the degree of change in vessel size (R=0.81, P<0.0001), but not with change in plaque amount (R=-0.19, P=0.32). In fact, in 57% of the patients who demonstrated lumen loss, negative remodeling contributed more to lumen loss than did plaque progression. Diabetes at 2 years was the only significant independent clinical predictor of plaque progression and lumen loss.

CONCLUSION:

Despite significant plaque progression, negative remodeling correlated with coronary lumen loss between years 1 and 2 after cardiac transplantation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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