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BMC Microbiol. 2007 Nov 12;7:101.

Inhibitory activity spectrum of reuterin produced by Lactobacillus reuteri against intestinal bacteria.

Author information

1
Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, Laboratory of Food Biotechnology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland. valentine.cleusix@ilw.agrl.ethz.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Reuterin produced from glycerol by Lactobacillus reuteri, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine, is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. It has been postulated that reuterin could play a role in the probiotic effects of Lb. reuteri. Reuterin is active toward enteropathogens, yeasts, fungi, protozoa and viruses, but its effect on commensal intestinal bacteria is unknown. Moreover reuterin's mode of action has not yet been elucidated. Glutathione, a powerful antioxidant, which also plays a key role in detoxifying reactive aldehydes, protects certain bacteria from oxidative stress, and could also be implicated in resistance to reuterin. The aim of this work was to test the activity of reuterin against a representative panel of intestinal bacteria and to study a possible correlation between intracellular low molecular weight thiols (LMW-SH) such as glutathione, hydrogen peroxide and/or reuterin sensitivity. Reuterin was produced by Lb. reuteri SD2112 in pure glycerol solution, purified and used to test the minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC). Hydrogen peroxide sensitivity and intracellular LMW-SH concentration were also analysed.

RESULTS:

Our data showed that most tested intestinal bacteria showed MIC below that for a sensitive indicator Escherichia coli (7.5-15 mM). Lactobacilli and Clostridium clostridioforme were more resistant with MIC ranging from 15 to 50 mM. No correlation between bacterial intracellular concentrations of LMW-SH, including glutathione, and reuterin or hydrogen peroxide sensitivities were found.

CONCLUSION:

Our data showed that intestinal bacteria were very sensitive to reuterin and that their intracellular concentration of LMW-SH was not directly linked to their capacity to resist reuterin or hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that detoxification by LMW-SH such as glutathione is not a general mechanism and that other mechanisms are probably involved in bacterial tolerance to reuterin and hydrogene peroxide.

PMID:
17997816
PMCID:
PMC2222629
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2180-7-101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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