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Endocr Rev. 2008 Feb;29(1):76-131. Epub 2007 Nov 8.

The clinical significance of subclinical thyroid dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical and Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology, University of Naples Federico II, Via S. Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy. bebiondi@unina.it

Abstract

Subclinical thyroid disease (SCTD) is defined as serum free T(4) and free T(3) levels within their respective reference ranges in the presence of abnormal serum TSH levels. SCTD is being diagnosed more frequently in clinical practice in young and middle-aged people as well as in the elderly. However, the clinical significance of subclinical thyroid dysfunction is much debated. Subclinical hyper- and hypothyroidism can have repercussions on the cardiovascular system and bone, as well as on other organs and systems. However, the treatment and management of SCTD and population screening are controversial despite the potential risk of progression to overt disease, and there is no consensus on the thyroid hormone and thyrotropin cutoff values at which treatment should be contemplated. Opinions differ regarding tissue effects, symptoms, signs, and cardiovascular risk. Here, we critically review the data on the prevalence and progression of SCTD, its tissue effects, and its prognostic implications. We also examine the mechanisms underlying tissue alterations in SCTD and the effects of replacement therapy on progression and tissue parameters. Lastly, we address the issue of the need to treat slight thyroid hormone deficiency or excess in relation to the patient's age.

PMID:
17991805
DOI:
10.1210/er.2006-0043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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