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Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Jan;117(1):35-40. Epub 2007 Nov 15.

Definitions of recovery and outcomes of major depression: results from a 10-year follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan. furukawa@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Consensus operational definitions for symptomatic remission and recovery of a major depressive episode have been proposed but only irregularly followed.

METHOD:

We examined the predictive validity of different definitions of recovery in a multi-center 10-year follow-up study of an inception cohort of untreated unipolar major depressive episodes (n = 95). Time to recovery and time to recurrence after recovery were estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival analyses for alternative definitions requiring 2, 4, 6 or 12 months of remission to declare recovery.

RESULTS:

The median time to recovery was 3.0, 4.0, 4.0 and 12.0 months respectively. The index episode lasted longer than 24 months in 9.4%, 9.2%, 12.6% and 24.5%. The median time to subthreshold recurrence was 16.0, 32.0, 42.0 and 74.0 months.

CONCLUSION:

Either 4- or 6-month duration of remission defined a change point before which the episode was continuous and after which the recurrence was reasonably unlikely.

PMID:
17986318
PMCID:
PMC2253703
DOI:
10.1111/j.1600-0447.2007.01119.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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