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Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Apr;46(4):1346-59. Epub 2007 Sep 26.

Environment, diet and CpG island methylation: epigenetic signals in gastrointestinal neoplasia.

Author information

1
Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK. ian.johnson@bbsrc.ac.uk <ian.johnson@bbsrc.ac.uk>

Abstract

The epithelial surfaces of the mammalian alimentary tract are characterised by very high rates of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis, and in humans they are highly susceptible to cancer. The role of somatic mutations as drivers of carcinogenesis in the alimentary tract is well established, but the importance of gene silencing by epigenetic mechanisms is increasingly recognised. Methylation of CpG islands is an important component of the epigenetic code that regulates gene expression during development and normal cellular differentiation, and a number of genes are well known to become abnormally methylated during the development of tumours of the oesophagus, stomach and colorectum. Aberrant patterns of DNA methylation develop as a result of pathological processes such as chronic inflammation, and in response to various dietary factors, including imbalances in the supply of methyl donors, particularly folates, and exposure to DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which include polyphenols and possibly isothiocyanates from plant foods. However the importance of these environmental interactions in human health and disease remains to be established. Recent moves to modify the exposure of human populations to folate, by mandatory supplementation of cereal foods, emphasise the importance of understanding the susceptibility of the human epigenome to dietary and other environmental effects.

PMID:
17976883
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2007.09.101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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