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J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2007 Nov;70(22):1879-87.

Partitioning behavior of aromatic components in jet fuel into diverse membrane-coated fibers.

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1
Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606, USA. Ronald_Baynes@ncsu.edu

Abstract

Jet fuel components are known to partition into skin and produce occupational irritant contact dermatitis (OICD) and potentially adverse systemic effects. The purpose of this study was to determine how jet fuel components partition (1) from solvent mixtures into diverse membrane-coated fibers (MCFs) and (2) from biological media into MCFs to predict tissue distribution. Three diverse MCFs, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, lipophilic), polyacrylate (PA, polarizable), and carbowax (CAR, polar), were selected to simulate the physicochemical properties of skin in vivo. Following an appropriate equilibrium time between the MCF and dosing solutions, the MCF was injected directly into a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC-MS) to quantify the amount that partitioned into the membrane. Three vehicles (water, 50% ethanol-water, and albumin-containing media solution) were studied for selected jet fuel components. The more hydrophobic the component, the greater was the partitioning into the membranes across all MCF types, especially from water. The presence of ethanol as a surrogate solvent resulted in significantly reduced partitioning into the MCFs with discernible differences across the three fibers based on their chemistries. The presence of a plasma substitute (media) also reduced partitioning into the MCF, with the CAR MCF system being better correlated to the predicted partitioning of aromatic components into skin. This study demonstrated that a single or multiple set of MCF fibers may be used as a surrogate for octanol/water systems and skin to assess partitioning behavior of nine aromatic components frequently formulated with jet fuels. These diverse inert fibers were able to assess solute partitioning from a blood substitute such as media into a membrane possessing physicochemical properties similar to human skin. This information may be incorporated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to provide a more accurate assessment of tissue dosimetry of related toxicants.

PMID:
17966059
DOI:
10.1080/15287390701549146
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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