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J Pediatr. 2007 Nov;151(5):506-12. Epub 2007 Sep 17.

Early umbilical cord clamping contributes to elevated blood lead levels among infants with higher lead exposure.

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1
Department of Nutrition, Program in International and Community Nutrition, University of California, Davis, California 95616-8669, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether infant iron status, modified by umbilical cord clamping time and infant feeding mode, affected infant blood lead concentration at 6 months of age.

STUDY DESIGN:

Participants were a subset of women and their infants randomized to receive early (10 seconds) or delayed (2 minutes) umbilical cord clamping and were monitored to 6 months postpartum in Mexico City. Iron and lead status was analyzed in maternal, placental, and 6-month infant blood samples. Baseline maternal lead exposure data and infant feeding data at 2, 4, and 6 months were collected.

RESULTS:

In the total sample, maternal blood lead concentration, infant ferritin, and breast-feeding practices predicted infant blood lead concentration. Among infants with higher placental blood lead concentration and breast-fed infants not receiving any iron-fortified formula or milk at 6 months, early clamping increased infant blood lead concentration, an effect mediated in part via decreased infant iron status.

CONCLUSIONS:

Early cord clamping, by decreasing infant iron status, contributes to higher blood lead concentrations at 6 months of age among infants at high risk.

PMID:
17961694
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.04.056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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