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J Biol Chem. 2007 Dec 14;282(50):36240-9. Epub 2007 Oct 22.

Runx2- and histone deacetylase 3-mediated repression is relieved in differentiating human osteoblast cells to allow high bone sialoprotein expression.

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1
Metastasis Research Laboratory, Center of Experimental Cancer Research and Bone and Cartilage Metabolism Research Unit, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium.

Abstract

Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a bone matrix glycoprotein whose expression coincides with terminal osteoblastic differentiation and the onset of mineralization. In this study we show that BSP expression is considerably increased in confluent Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells and in differentiating normal human osteoblasts, concomitantly with the decrease of Runx2, a key transcription factor controlling bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of Runx2 in the regulation of BSP expression in Saos-2 cells. Using a mobility shift assay, we demonstrated that Runx2 binds to the BSP promoter only in preconfluent cells. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) has been recently shown to act as a Runx2 co-repressor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that both Runx2 and HDAC3 are detectable at the BSP promoter in preconfluent Saos-2 cells but not when they are confluent and overexpress BSP. Consistently, nuclear Runx2 protein level is down-regulated, whereas Saos-2 cells became increasingly confluent. Finally, the suppression of HDAC3, Runx2, or both by RNA interference induced the expression of BSP at both mRNA and protein levels in Saos-2 cells. Our data demonstrate that Runx2 and HDAC3 repress BSP gene expression and that this repression is suspended upon osteoblastic cell differentiation. Both the nuclear disappearance of Runx2 and the non-recruitment of HDAC3 represent new means to relieve Runx2-mediated suppression of BSP expression, thus allowing the acquisition of a fully differentiated and mineralization-competent phenotype by osteoblast cells.

PMID:
17956871
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M705833200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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