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J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Jan;23(1):19-24. Epub 2007 Oct 23.

Body mass index is inversely related to mortality in elderly subjects.

Author information

1
Geriatric Department, Beilinson Hospital, The Rabin Medical Center, Petach-Tikva, Israel. avrahamw@clalit.org.il

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To study the long-term effect of being overweight on mortality in very elderly subjects.

METHODS:

The medical records of 470 inpatients (226 males) with a mean age of 81.5 +/- 7 years and hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward between 1999 and 2000 were reviewed for this study. Body mass index (BMI) at admission day was subdivided into quartiles: <22, 22-25, 25.01-28, and > or =28 kg/m(2). Patients were followed-up until August 31, 2004. Mortality data were taken from death certificates.

RESULTS:

During a mean follow-up of 3.46 +/- 1.87 years (median 4.2 years [range 1.6 to 5.34 years]), 248 patients died. Those who died had lower baseline BMI than those who survived (24.1 +/- 4.2 vs 26.3 +/- 4.6 kg/m(2); p < .0001). The age-adjusted mortality rate decreased from 24 to 9.6 per 100 patient-years from the highest to lowest BMI quartile (p < .001). BMI was associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality even after controlling for sex. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model identified that even after controlling for male gender, age, renal failure, and diabetes mellitus, which increased the risk of all-cause mortality, elevated BMI decreased the all-cause mortality risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

In very elderly subjects, elevated BMI was associated with reduced mortality risk.

PMID:
17955304
PMCID:
PMC2173925
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-007-0429-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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