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J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Jan;23(1):1-6. Epub 2007 Oct 23.

Association between angina and treatment satisfaction after myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Outcomes Research, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver VA Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA. Meg.Plomondon@va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient satisfaction is increasingly recognized as a quality indicator and important outcome of care. Little is known about the clinical factors associated with satisfaction after myocardial infarction (MI).

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the hypothesis that angina after MI is independently associated with lower treatment satisfaction.

METHODS:

We evaluated 1,815 MI patients from 19 U.S. centers. Angina was measured at 1 and 6 months after MI using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ). Treatment satisfaction was measured using the SAQ at 6 months. Multivariable regression was used to evaluate the association between 1- and 6-month angina and 6-month treatment satisfaction.

RESULTS:

Sixty-two percent of patients had no angina at 1 and 6 months after MI, 14% had transient angina (angina at 1 month, no angina at 6 months), 11% had new angina (angina at 6 months only), and 13% had persistent angina (angina at both 1 and 6 months). In unadjusted analysis, the presence of angina at 6 months, whether new or persistent, was associated with lower treatment satisfaction (p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, angina was associated with lower treatment satisfaction [relative risk (RR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4-3.5 patients with new angina; RR 3.1, 95% CI 2.5-3.9 patients with persistent angina, vs patients with no angina].

CONCLUSIONS:

In conclusion, angina in the 6 months following MI is present in almost 1 in 4 patients and is strongly associated with lower treatment satisfaction. This suggests the importance of angina surveillance and management after MI as a possible target to improve treatment satisfaction and, thereby, quality of care.

PMID:
17955303
PMCID:
PMC2173926
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-007-0430-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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