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Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2007 Jul;36(4):502-5.

[Evaluation on the application of the mouse nicotine toxicity experiment in tobacco control among adolescents].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the application of the mouse nicotine toxicity experiment in tobacco control among adolescents.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1626 students of three secondary schools with self-administered questionnaires three months after the intervention. The measurements of the student' s evaluation included their response, confidence and support to the experiment.

RESULTS:

Among the respondents, 87.4% had interest in the experiment and 84.0% had perceived its impact. The mouse nicotine toxicity experiment was attracted by greater interest from the students and was strong perceived by impact on them, when compared with the multi-media and the textbook. There were statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference in students' response between the three interventions. And 85.5% of the students believed that nicotine could be similar effects on the human body and 83.7% thought that the experiment could educate middle school students refuse smoking. Among the students, 76.4% agreed to show this kind of animal experiments to middle school students but 9.4% objected. 843 (51.9%) students were willing to do the experiment by themselves. The grade 7 students had lower response and confidence to the experiment than grade 8 students (P < 0.05). The evaluation on the experiment were significant (P < 0.05) different among the students in three smoking stages: non-smokers more than irregular smokers more than regular smokers.

CONCLUSION:

The mouse nicotine toxicity experiment was believed by most students and could get great support from them. It could deserve wider application in school-based tobacco control programs.

PMID:
17953222
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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