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J Immunol. 2007 Nov 1;179(9):5819-28.

Autoimmunity stimulated by adoptively transferred dendritic cells is initiated by both alphabeta and gammadelta T cells but does not require MyD88 signaling.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

Abstract

Vaccination of nonautoimmune prone mice with syngeneic dendritic cells (DC) readily induces anti-DNA autoantibodies but does not trigger systemic disease. We observed that anti-DNA autoantibody generation absolutely required alphabeta T cells and that gammadelta T cells also contributed to the response, but that regulatory T cells restrained autoantibody production. Although both NZB/W F(1) mice and DC vaccinated C57/BL6 mice produced autoantibodies against dsDNA, vaccinated mice had higher levels of Abs against H1 histone and lower levels of antinucleosome Abs than NZB/W F(1) mice. Despite a 100-fold increase in IL-12 and Th1 skewing to a foreign Ag, OVA, synergistic TLR activation of DC in vitro failed to augment anti-DNA Abs or promote class switching beyond that induced by LPS alone. TLR stimulation was not absolutely required for the initial loss of B cell tolerance because anti-DNA levels were similar when wild-type (WT) or MyD88-deficient DC were used for vaccination or WT and MyD88-deficient recipients were vaccinated with WT DC. In contrast, systemic administration of LPS, augmented anti-DNA Ab levels and promoted class switching, and this response was dependent on donor DC signaling via MyD88. LPS also augmented responses in the MyD88-deficient recipients, suggesting that LPS likely exerts its effects on both transferred DC and host B cells in vivo. These results indicate that both the alphabeta and gammadelta subsets are necessary for promoting autoantibody production by DC vaccination, and that although TLR/MyD88 signaling is not absolutely required for initiation, this pathway does promote augmentation, and Th1-mediated skewing, of anti-DNA autoantibodies.

PMID:
17947655
PMCID:
PMC2601662
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.179.9.5819
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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