Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2008 Jan;46(1):43-8. Epub 2007 Oct 16.

Novel ecological niche of Cetobacterium somerae, an anaerobic bacterium in the intestinal tracts of freshwater fish.

Author information

1
Department of Marine Science and Resources, Nihon University, Kameino, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan.

Erratum in

  • Lett Appl Microbiol. 2008 Feb;46(2):282.

Abstract

AIMS:

This study was conducted to clarify the taxonomic status of Bacteroides type A strains with high vitamin B(12)-producing ability that is widely distributed in the intestinal tracts of freshwater fish.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Seventeen strains of Bacteroides type A isolated from five fish species were all rod-shaped and gram-negative. The strains were positive for esculin hydrolysis, nitrate reduction, resistance to bile, acid phosphatase, and negative for the production of catalase and urease and the susceptibility to vancomycin. The G+C content of DNA from the 17 strains was 29 x 1-31 x 9 mol%, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed a close phylogenetic relationship between Bacteroides type A strains and Cetobacterium somerae sharing 99 x 7-100% sequence similarity. In addition, strains were capable of producing vitamin B(12) at a rate of 1 x 82-13 x 98 ng ml(-1) in 48 h.

CONCLUSION:

Phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics indicated that all isolates previously classified as Bacteroides type A strains belong to C. someare.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY:

This study provided the important finding of novel niche of vancomycin-resistant bacteria such as C. somerae in the intestinal tract of freshwater fish.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center