Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2007 Nov;85(7):772-6.

Glycaemic control and control of risk factors in diabetes patients in an ophthalmology clinic: what lessons have we learned from the UKPDS and DCCT studies?

Author information

1
St. Paul's Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. chanhiggins@tiscali.co.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) have studied glycaemic control as well as other risk factors in preventing the progression of diabetic end-organ disease, including diabetic retinopathy. We wished to determine to what extent a cross-section of diabetes patients attending our eye clinic met the targets laid down by recent landmark studies.

METHODS:

We prospectively assessed 44 consecutive diabetes patients attending outpatient clinics for assessment of diabetic retinopathy. Each patient had HbA1c levels, serum cholesterol and blood pressure checked. A proforma was completed for each patient.

RESULTS:

Of the 44 patients studied, 11 had type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and 33 had type 2 DM (11 insulin-dependent DM [IDDM], 22 non-insulin-dependent DM [NIDDM]). The mean age of type 1 DM patients was 43 years; that of type 2 DM patients was 62 years. Five of 11 (46%) type 1 DM patients had poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c > 9%) compared with four of 33 (12%) type 2 DM patients. Overall, 27 of 44 (62%) patients were on antihypertensive medication. The prevalence of poorly controlled blood pressure (> 150/85 mmHg treated; > 160/90 mmHg untreated) was 16 of 44 (36%) patients overall, and was higher for type 2 DM patients (13/33, 39%) than for type 1 DM patients (3/11, 27%). Random serum cholesterol levels > 5.2 were found in 10 of 44 (23%) patients overall (4/11 [36%] type 1 and 6/33 [18%] type 2 DM patients).

CONCLUSIONS:

Control of HbA1c, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia can slow progression of retinopathy and other DM end-points. Many of our patients were poorly controlled in terms of these risk factors. More attention should be addressed to these primary preventative factors in the management of diabetes patients.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center