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J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Nov;18(11):2953-9. Epub 2007 Oct 17.

Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and survival among aboriginal people.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

Globally, it is known that the incidence of end-stage renal disease is higher among Aboriginals, but it is unknown whether this is due to an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease or other unidentified factors. We studied 658,664 people of non-First Nations and 14,989 people of First Nations and found that the age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of chronic kidney disease was significantly higher among those of non-First Nations compared to those of First Nations (67.5 versus 59.5 per 1000 population; P < 0.0001). However, severe chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2) was almost two-fold higher among people of First Nations (P < 0.0001). Cox proportional hazards models suggested that compared to people of non-First Nations, those of First Nations with chronic kidney disease had a 77% increased risk of death after adjusting for age, gender, diabetes and baseline eGFR. In conclusion, whether the higher incidence of end-stage renal disease among people of First Nations is due to suboptimal management of chronic kidney disease and its associated comorbidities, more rapid loss of kidney function, or other unidentified factors remains to be determined.

PMID:
17942955
DOI:
10.1681/ASN.2007030360
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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