Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Man Ther. 2008 Aug;13(4):295-9. Epub 2007 Oct 17.

Prevalence of pain and dysfunction in the cervical and thoracic spine in persons with and without lateral elbow pain.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, S-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to survey the prevalence of pain in the cervical and thoracic spine (C2-T7) in persons with and without lateral elbow pain. Thirty-one subjects with lateral elbow pain and 31 healthy controls participated in the study. The assessment comprised a pain drawing, provocation tests of the cervical and thoracic spine, a neurodynamic test of the radial nerve, and active cervical range of motion. Seventy percent of the subjects with lateral elbow pain indicated pain in the cervical or thoracic spine, as compared to 16% in the control group (p<0.001). The frequency of pain responses to the provocation tests of the cervical and thoracic spine was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the lateral elbow pain (LEP) group, as was the frequency of pain responses to the neurodynamic test of the radial nerve (p<0.001). Cervical flexion and extension range of motion was significantly lower (p<0.01) in the LEP group. The results indicate a relation between lateral elbow pain and pain in the vertebral spine (C2-T7). The cervical and thoracic spine should be included in the assessment of patients with lateral elbow pain.

PMID:
17942362
DOI:
10.1016/j.math.2007.01.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center