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Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2007 Sep;13(5):428-33.

Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: pathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

Author information

1
Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, India. vijayanvk@hotmail.com

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is predominantly seen in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. It is being increasingly reported from other parts of world, however, due to increases in global travel and migration. This review focuses attention on recent developments.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is an occult form of human filariasis. The gamma-glutaryl transpeptidase found in the infective L3 stage larvae of Brugia malayi has been found to have similarities with the gamma-glutaryl transpeptidase present on the surface of human pulmonary epithelium. It has, therefore, been proposed that filarial gamma-glutaryl transpeptidase may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tropical eosinophilia. Airway hyperresponsiveness, manifesting as asthma-like syndrome, has been reported in tropical pulmonary eosinophilia and it has been suggested that interleukin-4 induces and interferon-gamma suppresses filarial-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. The intense eosinophilic alveolitis seen in acute tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is suppressed by 3 weeks of treatment with diethylcarbamazine citrate. A mild eosinophilic alveolitis along with radiological, physiological and hematological abnormalities, though with reduced intensity, persists in some patients however.

SUMMARY:

A chronic mild interstitial lung disease has been found to persist in tropical pulmonary eosinophilia despite treatment.

PMID:
17940489
DOI:
10.1097/MCP.0b013e3281eb8ec9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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