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Eur J Pharmacol. 2008 Jan 28;579(1-3):241-5. Epub 2007 Oct 3.

Protective effects of amlodipine and lacidipine on ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Ataturk University School of Medicine, TR-25240 Erzurum, Turkey. hzekai@atauni.edu.tr

Abstract

Bone is a dynamic organ system that is directly related to calcium and phosphor metabolism. Imbalance in these two parameters upon aging or menopause leads to osteoporosis. Recently, it was also shown by researchers that high blood pressure in elderly women is statistically associated with decreased bone mineral content at the femoral neck, which may increase the susceptibility to fractures. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of different doses of amlodipine and lacidipine on ovariectomized rat femurs' calcium and phosphor content. Bone calcium and phosphor concentration was measured by a Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometer. Calcium contents of the rat femurs were significantly lower in the ovariectomized group than in the sham group eight weeks after the operation. Amlodipine treatment at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg significantly increased the calcium (P<0.01) and phosphor concentrations (P<0.01) in the femurs of ovariectomized rats, compared to those of control (ovariectomized) group. Both doses of lacidipine (1 and 3 mg/kg) also effectively increased calcium concentrations (P<0.01) significantly in ovariectomized rats. On the other hand amlodipine treatment at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg significantly increased the calcium (P<0.01) and phosphor concentrations (P<0.01) in the femurs of ovariectomized rats compared with those of the sham group. In conclusion, amlodipine and lacidipine improved the bone loss in an ovariectomy induced osteopenic rat model. Our findings suggest that potent calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine and lacidipine have a beneficial effect on bone metabolism, and an antihypertensive effect.

PMID:
17936271
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejphar.2007.09.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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